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 Betreff des Beitrags: that they ignore these
BeitragVerfasst: 26 Feb 2019, 07:40 
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Last April, Nik Stauskass season at Michigan came crashing to a halt with a tough 82-76 loss to the Louisville Cardinals in the NCAA Championship game. The 66" shooting guard started all but six games in his freshman year, averaging 11 points per game and shooting .440 from the three-point line. Based on his post-game comments, it was clear that he took the championship loss hard. "We just got to move on," he said, his eyes clearly filled with tears. "I know myself, Im going to get back in the gym tomorrow to start working on my game." Stauskas wasnt giving lip service. The dozen or so shooting videos, shot from his backyard in Mississauga, Ontario in sun, rain and snow on YouTube, attest to his incredible drive. His quest for improvement was doubly as important as the top two players on the Wolverines, National Player of the Year, Trey Burke and Tim Hardaway, Jr., were both selected as first-round picks in this past Junes NBA Draft. With their departure, someone had to emerge on the team to pick up the slack and Stauskass work ethic would not allow it to be anyone else but him. "It just comes from me loving the game," he said. "I enjoy playing basketball, so its not really work for me. I enjoy getting better and anytime you go out there and see yourself being successful, it motivates you to try even more and get even better. Its kind of like a cycle for me - the better I get, the more I want to work." Already established as one of the best shooters in college basketball, Stauskas spent the summer in Ann Arbor, Michigan, rounding out his game. Working on his ball-handling to take defenders off the dribble and finish at the rim, he also added 16 pounds of muscle to his lithe frame. The result of his efforts was something no one expected him to do, by averaging 18.2 points in his first 11 games of the season. When met with stiffer competition in the Big 10 Conference, he led the Wolverines to a 9-1 record in one of the toughest conferences in the NCAA, all of which translated into Michigan moving up the national rankings and garnering the sophomore a spot on the Naismith Award Midseason Top 30 list. "Ive never really had recognition like that before," Stauskas said. "To be put in that group with those guys, its an honour. Theyre all really talented and its a prestigious award. Im happy that I can be there and that my work is paying off." Yet as Stauskass talent continues to develop with increased freedom and responsibility, opposing coaches have recognized this, as well. In some games, he has been neutralized as defences key in on Michigans primary threat. "I think the biggest challenge for me personally has just been addressing the way teams have been defending me," he said. "A lot of teams have been preparing for me, more than anyone else on our team. Getting double-teamed and being face-guarded has been an adjustment for me, cause Ive never had to deal with that before. Its made me work harder in a lot of areas I havent had to work on before." Stauskass growth, however, isnt solely physical, as he has had to make the adjustment to being a leader on his team. "Its tougher to pick up the rest of the team and stay positive and encourage everyone else while you struggle personally," Stauskas. Yet, he recognizes its a necessary adjustment to take his team and game to the next level. His focus and drive to succeed wont allow him to think otherwise. This April, Stauskas has similar visions on what another Michigan group of fabulous freshmen accomplished in consecutive seasons - back-to-back trips to the NCAA Championship game. "After the loss we had in the Final Four, obviously our goal is to get back there and win that championship game," he said. "At the same time, we came two points away from winning a Big 10 Championship. Those are both goals I want to achieve coming back this year. The way were playing right now, I think were right on pace to do that, we just have to keep working hard." Mookie Betts Jersey .Boston beat the Nashville Predators 5-3 on Tuesday night and celebrated consecutive wins for the first time in more than a month. Blake Swihart Jersey . The Thornhill, Ont., native, who is ranked 11th in the world, said hed hoped he would be ready when Canada begins its World Group first-round tie against Japan in Tokyo on Friday. http://www.theredsoxteamshop.com/Red-Sox-Jackie-Bradley-Jr-Kids-Jersey/ . -- New York Yankees centre fielder Jacoby Ellsbury was sent for an MRI Thursday of his ailing right calf, which was negative. Tony Conigliaro Jersey . Gough finished in fourth, 0.433 seconds behind American Erin Hamlin, who took the bronze medal at the Sanki Sliding Center in Rzhanaya Polyana. Custom Boston Red Sox Jerseys . "Uuufff," was all shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria could come up with after Stantons latest mammoth shot.Most diminutive players are forced to take the long road to NHL arenas, if they get there at all. The Habs Brendan Gallagher waited until the fifth round to hear his name called at the 2010 draft. Teammate David Desharnais never heard his name called and needed to ply his trade in the ECHL before the Habs took notice and signed him as a free agent. Mike Weaver was similarly undrafted. Brian Gionta and Tomas Plekanec went in the third round of their respective drafts. St. Louis was passed over by midget teams, ironically, ignored by the QMJHL, undrafted, signed by the Flames but later bought out after being exposed and unselected during the 2000 expansion draft, signed by Tampa Bay, and then became a surefire first ballot Hall of Famer, Stanley Cup winner, and Olympic gold medalist. But too small to play in this mans NHL, for sure.(h/tNational Post)If smaller skaters are in tough against the closed-mindedness of hockeys front offices, then life is near impossible for wee goalies. If the hockey community had its way, Dustin Tokarski would be working the take-out window at a Tim Hortons in Saskatchewan. At 511, he is everything the scouts are not looking for in a goalie. He is not the prototype. He is not Carey Price. Tampa Bay scout Charlie Hodge (himself a small, 56, NHL goaltender who accomplished nothing in the league with his limited stature other than six Stanley Cups and two Vezinas) had to beg the Lightning to draft Tokarski in the fifth round. And while, despite Montreal folklores contention, the legend of Tokarski is still being written, his play in the Eastern Conference Final is argument for a less structured approach to the game in both drafting and roster building.In a league that clings desperately to intangibles like "grit", "sandpaper", and "hockey sense", its laughable that they ignore these very qualities in players simply because they couldnt look Chris Pronger in the eye if standding on a barstool.dddddddddddd. And perhaps its the fact that they are ignored that makes them the players they are, products of adversity. More likely its a lack of ambition and creativity in front offices, which denies ambitious and creative players the opportunity to play in the league, and to better the game.The argument in favour of a broader notion of what makes an NHLer is on the ice this postseason, and in particular in the Rangers-Habs series and their respective runs to the Conference Final. Desharnais has been arguably Montreals best forward, if not their most consistent. Gallagher is proving that strength comes from within, and not gigantism. Tokarski has gone from relative obscurity to revelation. Weaver is more adept at blocking shots than Peter Budaj. Sixth-rounder Hagelin is proving to be perhaps the fastest skater in the league. Zucarello, affectionately nicknamed the Hobbit, is a force with his speed and creativity. And the grandfather of them all, St. Louis, is authoring a tale for the ages, the kind of postseason story that makes the playoffs so compelling.(h/t 5 Minutes For Fighting)Maurice Richard, Bobby Hull and son Brett were 510. Gordie Howe, Wayne Gretzky and Bobby Orr were measured at 6, but they were wearing their shoes. Guy Lafleur was also listed at 6, but at least two of those inches were hair. At some point during the 90s, when scouting staffs inflated and Eric Lindros arrived, the NHL experienced a sea change in philosophy. They became infatuated with size and believed they could manufacture skill and scoring through systems. The result was lower scoring, issues with concussions, and endless tinkering with rules in order to create the very scoring that they themselves had diluted. In witnessing one of the most entertaining and compelling postseasons in recent memory, one hopes that the NHL can again changes its ways, and value skill no matter what size the package it comes in. ' ' '
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